Vitamin B12 and Iron Injections

[title size=”1″ content_align=”left” style_type=”single solid” sep_color=”” class=”” id=””]Vitamin B12 Injections[/title]

[title size=”2″ content_align=”left” style_type=”single solid” sep_color=”” class=”” id=””]What is Vitamin B12?[/title]

Vitamin B12, also known as cobalamin, is one of eight B vitamins and is required for normal metabolism in each cell of the human body.  Vitamin B12 is involved in the conversion of carbohydrates and fats into energy and is important for protein synthesis.  Vitamin B12 helps support normal function for blood and nerve cells. Although most people obtain sufficient amounts of vitamin B12 from their diet, conditions such as malnutrition, malabsorption, or GI disorders or infections can lead to vitamin B12 deficiency. Vitamin B12 deficiency can cause nerve damage, stomach issues, and anemia.

[title size=”2″ content_align=”left” style_type=”single solid” sep_color=”” class=”” id=””]What are Vitamin B12 Injections?[/title]

Vitamin B12 injections are typically administered using cyanocobalamin, a synthetic form of vitamin B12.  Injections are given intramuscularly (into the muscle) or subcutaneously (under the skin).

[title size=”1″ content_align=”left” style_type=”single solid” sep_color=”” class=”” id=””]Iron Injections[/title]

[title size=”2″ content_align=”left” style_type=”single solid” sep_color=”” class=”” id=””]What Is Iron?[/title]

Iron is a mineral that plays an important role in a variety of biological processes.  Iron chelation to hemoglobin is essential for its ability to transport oxygen. Iron is normally obtain through the diet from iron-rich foods such as red meat, fish, poultry, beans, and leafy vegetables. Iron deficiency can result from malnutrition, poor absorption, or excessive blood loss and lead to anemia (reduced number of red blood cells).

[title size=”2″ content_align=”left” style_type=”single solid” sep_color=”” class=”” id=””]What are Iron Injections?[/title]

Iron injections are usually administered intramuscularly into the buttock. When receiving an iron injection for the first time, a small, test injection is first given to detect a possible allergic reaction.